Today’s best cat foods–reviews of canned and raw options

SMALL UPDATE April 2014  (Blue Buffalo Bistro removed because discontinued. Blue Buffalo Wild Delights removed due to adding carrageenan. Also see July 2013 changes noted here)

The cat food world changes A LOT. When I have time, this list MAY occasionally be updated. You can help others by sharing info in the Comments. 

Scratching your head in the cat food aisle? I’ve been there.

In fact, I’ve become a bit obsessive about how to choose the best cat food. I hope the hours of research and time I put into it will help you–and your cat.

If you’re curious, I explain how I selected these cat foods here.

If your cat has special health issues, please be sure to consult with a good vet about their food. If your cat has an illness and weakened immunity, it’s probably a good idea to avoid raw meat as a precaution against bacteria.

To assure you these food reviews are unbiased, I never use an affiliate (referral) link for a cat food.

FIRST PLACE
CANNED OR RAW CAT FOODS

WHAT’S
TO LOVE

COST

SPECIAL
CONCERNS & TIPS

Primal, RAW
frozen
Some ingredients are organic (not the meats though).
Small company focused solely on quality pet food.
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Raw is considered most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Very low starch, grain
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Tip: See their helpful food portion calculator provided online (it’s challenging to calculate amounts without it)
Uses water High Pressure Processing to kill bad bacteria while preserving the enzymes that make raw food nutrients so available.
Bravo Balance RAW frozen
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Hormone-free, grass-fed red meats; no antibiotics

 

LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Only the BALANCE formulas are appropriate to serve to cats without adding appropriate supplements.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with kidney issues or constipation.
Radcat RAW Frozen
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Simple formula
Most ingredients are organic or pasture-raised.
Raw is considered most easily digested,
nutrient-available form of cat food.
Very low starch, grain free
VERY HIGH compared to others on this list.
HOWEVER, this is because the recommend serving size is larger than the serving size recommend for other raw products.
AND Rad Cat says some cats may not need as much as they recommend, depending on cat size and activity level.
TIP: You can get 4 for the price of 3 of any Rad Cat size at Pet food Express stores (at least in California). Saves a bundle!
Not quite as convenient to serve as other raw food because it’s
not pre-portioned
Good news for cats with constipation: Uses organic egg shell calcium instead of ground bones, so it may be more suitable for cats with constipation. (Works best for our cat who can’t digest ground bone!)
 
 
Tiki Cat Koolina Luau canned and  Puka Puka Luau (both chicken)
tikiKoolkinapuka_pukatiki
Very low starch, grain free
Manufactured in a human food factory
USDA certified chicken
Very simple ingredients– easy on digestion
No BPA in cans
No carrageenan
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Made inThailand at a human food factory.  USDA certified chicken.
Feline’s Pride RAW Frozen
Good variety of selections: Cornish hen, turkey, chicken, duck, and more
Simple recipe (best digestion)
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Recommended by Feline
Nutrition Education Society

and Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM is also a fan
Low starch, grain free
MED (when extra shipping costs are added) daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Order online at www.felinespride.com
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Darwins RAW frozen darwins
All meats are hormone-and antibiotic-free and free-range
Claim human-quality ingredients
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Simple recipe (best for digestion)
MED-LOW
Lab-tested to meet and exceed AAFCO guidelines
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation
 Pure Vita canned  
Grain free, low starch
Fairly simple ingredients
Manufactured at company-owned US plant
Fish meal is cetified ethoxyquin-free
No carrageenan

 

 

MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Good news: Though formula includes potato starch, the carb percentage remains very low (under 5%).
Good news: Controversial ingredient Menadione (synthetic K) was removed from product.
Hound & Gatos canned hound
No BPA in can lining
No carrageenan
Low starch, grain free
Claim human-quality
US food and factory
Very simple ingredients are ideal for sensitive digestion
LOW-MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Available at Pet Food Express
Best online price may be at PetFoodDirect.com
PAW NATURAW RAW frozen PAW_NATURAW
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Organic meats!
Low starch, grain free
Variety of formulas
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the AAFCO.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation
They also have a freeze-dried raw cat food that looks good.

SECOND PLACE
CANNED OR RAW CAT FOODS

WHAT’S
TO LOVE

COST

WHY 2nd PLACE
& TIPS

Primal Freeze Dried RAW
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Some ingredients are organic (not the meat)
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Add water  –  Cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t add water.
All raw dehydrated food are in 2nd place because they require water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Feline Natural Raw Freeze Dried by K9
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Nice simple ingredients are easy on digestiom (if you add water as instructed –
cats accidentally overeat if you don’t)
Clean New Zealand sourced ingredients
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Stir in warm water (at about body temp); don’t have to wait to serve. Cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t add water.
All raw dehydrated are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
“Has been tested and exceeds the AAFCO minimum requirements” – including taurine. (Shane Bartlettf, K9 Natural Food)
Honest Kitchen GRACE DEHYDRATED
grace-grain-free-cat-food-4lb
Only pet food legally allowed to call themselves “human grade” (they won a lawsuit). Company owned US plant is certified for organic and kosher products by the state of California.
Meat is steamed at low temperatures to kill pathogens while conserving nutrient quality, then dehydrated.
Grain free
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods. NOTE “Grace” is lower in carbs and simpler in ingredients than “Prowl”
You need to add water soak it for about 15-20 minutes before serving.
Introduce gradually. Texture is unique–some cats resist it. Ours like it better with ground turkey added.
Tip: Best deal I found on a trial
size
is at their online store.
Ziwipeak, Raw air-DEHYDRATED
Omega 3s (fish oil)
No hormones and antibiotics
8% more moisture than most dry foods–more if you add water.
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free; nice simple ingredients
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT To support kidney and urinary wellness in healthy cats, I would not serve this without mixing in some water.
All raw dehydrated food are in 2nd place because they require water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Several experts say dry foods are too dehydrating for cats with kidney problems.
Stellas Freeze Dried RAW

Only the Chicken, Duck, and Turkey are Menadione-free.
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Nice simple ingredients are easy on digestion
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
All raw dehydrated are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Avoid the seafood formulas, as they contain Menadione.
IMPORTANT: Add water; rehydrate for 1 minute.  Add water as instructed.
cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
LOTUS canned
No carrageenan
No ethoxyquin in fish
Very low starch, grain free
All ingredients sourced from US, Canada,
New Zealand
Made in small batches in US
Claim not to have BPA in lining
Medium daily feeding cost compared to
others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains large fish (4th ingredient), so should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
Taste of the WILD canned
No BPA in cans
No carrageenan
No ethoxyquin in fish
Low starch, grain free
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains large fish, so should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
Also contains small amount of menadione sodium bisulfite (controversial form of vitamin K)
Nature’s Variety Instinct LID canned

LIDcat_duck_5oz_0
Meats sourced from US and New Zealand
(except rabbit)
No carrageenan
Very low starch, grain free
No BPA in 5.5oz and 3 oz cans
GMO free
Owned by an independent pet food company (rather than large conglomerate). Manufactured in US at APHIS EU Certified plant.
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because some consumers are concerned about the montmorillonite clay. Opinions about it are all over the map. Some consider it detoxifying, some say it could have contaminants. Here’s another company’s exploration of the topic.
Statement from Nature’s Variety: “Our vendor tests the Montmorillonite Clay used in our diets for toxins and it is guaranteed toxin-free.”
I prefer the LID formulas as they have more simple ingredients than other Nature’s Variety canned recipes.
ADDICTION Carrageenan-free formulas only: Duck, Venison, Buffalo, Rabbit, Turkey
Grain free
No carrageenan
Manufactured in company-owned New Zealand plant
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods.
Also because many formulas large fish, so those should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
Soulistic canned Carrageenan-free formulas only: Good Karma, Harvest Sunrise
Claims human-quality food sources and “free range” chicken
No GMOs
Grain free
No Carrageenan (Good Karma and Harvest Sunrise)
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods.
Other carrageenan-free formulas were removed from this list because they contain controversial ingredient Menadione (synthetic K)
Manufactured in Thaliand at USDA-approved human food facility
You’ll find it at PETCO
Stellas Freeze Dried Raw
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Nice simple ingredients are easy on digestion
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Add water; rehydrate for 1 minute.  Add water as instructed –
cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t.
All raw dehydrated are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Great Life Essentials canned  greatLife
Meats sourced from US
No carrageenan
Low starch, grain free
No GMOs

 

LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because Great Life uses the Evanger’s plant  (US) for processing their own canned (not dry) formulas. In 2010 Evangers was found by the FDA to be using dishonest practices on their own formulas (since corrected). Therefore, some are uncomfortable with any foods processed at the Evangers factory.
SOJOS Freeze Dried Raw  SOJOS
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
USDA meat
Variety of formulas to choose
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Add water to ensure proper amounts of food and moisture; Cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t add water.
All raw dehydrated foods are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with kidney issues or constipation
Meets (exceeds) minimum nutritional levels established by the AAFCO.com.
Tiki Cat Hanalei Luau Wild Salmon, canned
Sources through environmental fishing practices; seafood sustainability and food safety guidelines
Manufactured in a human food factory (quality is visible—looks and smells like human food)
Omega 3’s
No carrageenan
No BPA in cans
Low starch, grain free
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list
In 2nd place because contains large fish, so should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
No longer contains menadione (controversial synthetic vitamin K).
Note: Avoid the TikiCat formulas that have grain (rice) in them. (This Wild Salmon one doesn’t have it.)
Life’s Abundance Instinctive Choice canned
Simple ingredients, include organic chicken
Omega 3s (fish oil)
No carrageenan
Very low starch, grain free
No BPA in cans
US ingredients only
MED-HIGH daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because Instinctive Choice is manufactured in a Simmons Food facility – Simmons bought Menu Foods. (However, dreadful 2007 Menu Foods incidents/recall was related to foods with wheat gluten from China. This food does not contain wheat gluten or ingredients from China.)
Most cats love this food.
I can only find it online–by the case. I suggesting getting their trial size first.
You can save money & time with their auto-ship option.
 
Weruva Grain Free Pouches
No carrageenan
Simple ingredients
Grain free
Responsive customer service
Certified GMO-free
HIGH daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starch, making carb count a bit higher than 1st place foods.
Beef is from Australia & New Zealand. Fish is from international waters, except for Tilapia, which is farmed in Thailand. Chicken is from Thaliand.
Manufactured in Thailand in human-food processing facility.
Wellness Healthy Indulgence pouches with GRAIN FREE labels only
Grain free
High moisture
Less fuss than cans
No carrageenan
VERY HIGH daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Instructions say feed 2 pouches for every 5 lbs of cat, so an active 10 lb cat would need 4 pouches per day – that’s a lot.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods.
CAUTION: The pouches not labeled Grain Free contain oat fiber, which is gluten-free in this case, but may not be the most digestible substance for cats.

 

If your cat’s favorite natural cat food didn’t make the list…

Many cat foods almost made this list. There were so many foods, I had to be brutal in selecting.

See These natural cat foods didn’t make the “best” list: here’s why (includes the Runner Ups!).

Maybe I missed a food. Let me know if you have questions–I won’t always be able to answer every question personally, but I will add foods you ask about to my “To Be Researched” list.

I also started a list best dry cat foods here–with some health caveats.

Resources

Where to find these foods

  • Only Natural Pet Store (carries most of these foods – affiliate store chosen for their reasonable prices)
  • Amazon.com and Petfooddirect.com carry many of these foods.
  • Many brands are available online directly from the company that makes them
  • Your local pet food store (especially if holistic) may have some brands
  • Whole Foods carries Primal cat food

How to get your cat to eat new foods?

Resources for making cat food

Making your own raw cat food can cost even less than the packaged raw cat foods, and is one the healthiest things you can do for most cats.

However, it is absolutely essential that you do it right, and add proper nutrients—serious health problems could result if you don’t add the right nutrients.

Easiest way to get started making your own cat food with the right nutrients is to use a good supplement product like a Feline Instincts mix: You just order one of their mixes. Alnutrin is also a good supplement source for homemade cat food. If you’re in Canada or Europe TC Feline may be ideal for you. Others can get TC Feline in the US here. All these sources provide recipes and instructions so it’s not a mysterious process!

Some experts say you shouldn’t use store-bought meat (unless you cook it before adding supplements) because there are concerns about bacteria. Instead, they say you should grind your own or order from source that freezes immediately after cutting or grinding: Hare-Today carries many types of meats.

Tips: The No Bones About It or Alnturin with Calcium mixes are best for cats who have constipation issues. Feline Instincts and TC Feline also both have bone-free special mixes and recipes for cats with kidney problems.

Your experience? Let’s talk!

None of these foods are perfect, but they met my “best of” criteria. However, every cat has different needs, just like you and I do.

I welcome your experiences, opinions, and contributions in the comments below.

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1,242 Responses to Today’s best cat foods–reviews of canned and raw options

  1. Rachel Ellsworth Bradley October 27, 2014 at 8:38 am #

    Thanks much for this report! I looked up the supplements listed above that you would add to your own raw meat to make cat food and all 3 have powdered egg yolks! That means they all contain oxidized (ie. rancid) cholesterol! That’s very dangerous. I wouldn’t eat it and I wouldn’t feed it to an animal either. Does anyone know of a supplement that doesn’t contain the powdered egg yolk? I could add my own fresh yolk that hasn’t been so processed.

    • Latia December 17, 2014 at 11:13 am #

      I see that Nature’s Variety Instinct canned food is on the list, but what about their frozen raw food? My cat loves their frozen raw beef medallions and eats that exclusively now after switching from Tiki Cat chicken, which she LOVED. She’s a long haired Siberian who hates being brushed and had so many knots on her belly before that I had to shave her. Since switching completely to raw her coat has been knot free for 6 months with zero brushing. She also gets brewers yeast/garlic tablets and powder daily. I’m not sure if it’s the raw diet or the brewers yeast/garlic that improved her coat.

      • Bonnie December 17, 2014 at 10:24 pm #

        I always thought that garlic was toxic to cats, at least that is what I have read. I am glad your cat is doing better, but I never give my cats anything raw.

      • Lacey January 1, 2015 at 1:33 pm #

        I was wondering the same thing, is natures variety organic chicken one of the best foods? I feed canned puka from tiki cat and raw radcat chicken but I’m worried about the phosphorus level being 1.35% especially since my cat is drinking a lot yet constipated on this food and having dry flaky skin near her tail. I found a holistic vet whose available no sooner than in 2 weeks so im taking her in then. I’m afraid to try the lamb since i think my cat has ibd given how easily she vomits or gets diarrhea/constipation, and she vomited when i tried natures variety beef so i dont know if lamb would be same. Primal turkey and pheasant are both lower phosphorus, 1.07 and 0.97%, but have ground bones so which is better – natures variety which has lower phosphorus, or primal? Also wondering if weruva chicken frickazee and fowl ball are good? My goal is a very healthy food (no processed, by-products, artificial, carrageenan, preservatives, grains, or more than 10% carbs) with lower than 1% phosphorus to support kidney health and eliminate constipation. I love your site Liz and thank you so much for caring so much to share your research with all of us! Any advice will be appreciated.

    • Janine March 8, 2015 at 2:16 pm #

      TCfeline has taken the egg powder out of their mix and you add your own eggs:
      http://tcfeline.com/

  2. Thxie October 27, 2014 at 2:39 pm #

    I know raw foods have many benefits over canned or dry food. I having been searching good food for my cats and dogs for couple of years now. I used to try to feed my cats and dogs for raw food. I switched back to canned food for cats and dry food for dogs after I read USFDA’s report. here’s a link of one http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/AnimalHealthLiteracy/ucm373757.htm

    I have been told by many “animal nutritional specialist” that FDA is not familiar with pet health and so on.

    I am interested to know about your opinion on these kinds of report from FDA.

    • Darren November 2, 2014 at 6:46 pm #

      Thxie, I think the FDA is just being conservative in regard to food poisoning, exactly as they are for human food. It’s no different if you are eating undercooked fish or beef or whatever. No matter how good the food supply chain and preparation, there is always a risk of Salmonella, E Coli or other bugs, even if you butcher and prepare your own raw food. For example, cross contamination of raw to cooked food is a typical cause of human food poisoning in the kitchen and is just as possible if you prepare your own raw food. The risk is much larger if the distribution or preparation are poor. Some commercial raw foods use high pressure processing to kill bacteria. This avoids cooking but reduces the chance of food poisoning. Nature’s Variety, Primal (poultry) and Stella&Chewys come to mind offhand as using HPP. Perhaps start with one of these brands if you are concerned? My cats have been eating Primal Chicken/Salmon and S&C Duck Duck Goose for a while with no problems.

  3. Yongqing October 28, 2014 at 10:34 am #

    Does anyone have any experience with the new formula of Holistic Select Grain Free canned? The ingredients and price both look pretty good. No carrageenan etc.

    • Shasta November 1, 2014 at 11:47 pm #

      Yonqing, we’re currently working our way through a case of the Holistic Select Turkey Pate, and it’s been a big hit. I think it’s Lola’s favorite out of the foods we have to choose from in this rotation. The ingredients look pretty good to me as well, so I plan to try another one of their flavors next time I make an order.

      • Larry November 21, 2014 at 8:42 am #

        Hi Shasta, How are your cats doing on the Holistic Select canned foods?

  4. Jessy November 5, 2014 at 11:13 am #

    Are these safe for kittens? I just rescued a 7week old kitten and I’m trying to figure out healthy alternatives to feed her. Thanks so much!!

  5. Lee November 17, 2014 at 3:01 pm #

    Thank you for all the work you have done and for sharing with all of us who strive for improving the lives of our furry friends. My little guy looks much like your beautiful Bastet;I am sorry for your loss. Our Ninja was a stray and he is FIV+. I am wondering what your thoughts are for improving this immune system so we can enjoy him as long as possible. He is a very picky eater and I’m a previous dog owner so this is new. Right now we toss lots of good food because he won’t try it. Thank you! Lee

    • Bonnie Magallanes November 17, 2014 at 4:39 pm #

      Hi Lee, I have 5 cats and are all seniors. I feed them Grandma Mae’s dry food and Orijen, not the red, but the cat & kitten one. Then I feed them “Wild Calling”, canned food, mostly the one that says Cabin Fever on the can. It’s a little pricey but well worth it.

    • Bonnie November 17, 2014 at 4:51 pm #

      Hi Lee, I forgot to tell you that I never give my cats anything raw. I wouldn’t eat anything raw myself so I wouldn’t feed my animals that way either.

      • Sam December 26, 2014 at 1:30 pm #

        Humans aren’t designed to eat raw. But cats aren’t designed like humans. And cats are obligated carnivores. Just because you don’t eat something specifically, doesn’t mean your cat shouldn’t eat it…. Food for thought.

  6. Ucuz Mama November 18, 2014 at 8:48 am #

    Are these safe for kittens?

  7. Tamsen Ellen November 21, 2014 at 4:47 am #

    FYI….Hounds and Gatos is having a distribution thingy going on. You can buy them easily through Doggiefood.com now. Petfooddirect is on backorder.

    • Leannan February 8, 2015 at 4:38 pm #

      I’ve read reviews for Doggiefood.com and all of them were negative. Plus Doggiefood.com prices were much lower on the products I buy.I didn’t/don’t understand how they can be so low. It seems you are not having any problems though. Can you plz fill me in?

    • Brent March 13, 2015 at 12:32 pm #

      I wanted to try their food, especially the duck version, but you can’t find it anywhere. I gave up on Hounds and Gatos, although it looked like a good product. I also like that it’s made/sourced in the US and they did answer my email when I had a question. But for me – it’s too much hassle to have to scour the world to find their product. I never did find the duck in stock anywhere.

  8. Michelle Sergot November 23, 2014 at 9:23 am #

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge…Just noticed a new food at my local Chuck and Don’s that I am curious about. It is Weruva’s Cats in the kitchen grain free after reading ingredients, I did not find any Carrageenan listed. I do feed my babies grain free except for the few treats they get when I leave the house :) Would love you input on this food as both of my babies have come to really enjoy this!
    Thanks in advance!

  9. Elias November 25, 2014 at 1:19 pm #

    This might have been discussed already so I apologize in advance. Why is addiction on this list if they use BPA in their can lining? This is noted on their website. https://www.addictionfoods.com/faq/canned-food/faq.html

  10. Teresa November 28, 2014 at 9:45 am #

    what do you think of B.F.F (aka Best Feline Friend)?

    My criteria for good cat food is no carregeen, no chicken, no Turkey, no beef, no lamb, no sardines, and no mackerel.
    LONG list of can’t haves most are due to allergies, and only one variety from BFF meets all these. And 3 from tiki cat. Any suggestions on other brands I should look into?

  11. Richard November 30, 2014 at 1:51 pm #

    I don’t think your cat is allergic to chicken or turkey, but he or she is probably allergic to other ingredients in the food. Have you tried giving your cat raw food? A lot of additives, salt, synthetic vitamins, fruits and high starch vegetables cause problems in cats.

    • Teresa November 30, 2014 at 2:03 pm #

      I have given my one cat that is allergic to chicken/turkey raw food, and it doesn’t have the same allergic reaction, but she still does. When its presented in dry cat food form she actually gets puffy red welts on her ears and on her body that are very ichey for her. When she is given chicken or turkey in raw form she gets ichey red rashes all over her body that are very itchy to the point of her breaking skin.

  12. Shasta December 1, 2014 at 10:05 am #

    Quite well, Larry! I’m about to order another case.

  13. Wanda December 30, 2014 at 12:35 pm #

    Greetings, all.

    I’ve recently done much searching re: the wet/dry food issues and from there on to best brands for quality and nutritional value. Sites I perused include this site, Natural Cat Care Blog, Lisa Pierson’s site, and TAPF (Susan Thixton). The reason for my interest is that my 8-year-old girl just lost her twin sister; eight years is just too young! Hester recently crossed the rainbow bridge due to advanced kidney cancer which was undetected until that same month (November 2014). Both had been on Hill’s c/d dry since Hester was diagnosed with struvite crystals in 2010.

    After Hester’s crossing, I wanted to get Hannah on a better diet, especially after reading about the high carbs and fillers in far too many foods. My hope was to get her on canned food with kibble in moderation. One of the foods mentioned that my local pet store carries is Nature’s Variety Instinct. Thankfully my girl (Hannah) has taken to both the canned and the kibble.

    One concern mentioned re: NV was the source of the rabbit used in the NV rabbit formulas. I contacted the company over this past weekend (e-mail on December 28, 2014) to ask about this concern expressed in numerous places. My quote was this: “One concern mentioned though is the source of the rabbit used in your rabbit formulas, stating the rabbit is from China rather than the USA. If all other meat & ingredient sources are US-based or reliable countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand) then why China given its notorious unreliability with regard to any pet products? I look forward to you reply. Thank you. Wanda J. Kothlow (and Hannah)”

    Here is the reply I received Tuesday December 30, 2014:

    Hi Wanda,

    Thank you for writing and we’re sorry to hear about your recent loss.

    All of our poultry, pork, bison, and beef come from the U.S., our lamb and venison are imported from Australia and New Zealand, and our rabbit is sourced from France. We source most of our ingredients from the U.S. and turn to other locations only as needed. We are very stringent on our sourcing and have good relationships built with our vendors for quality ingredients.

    Sincerely,

    Kim

    Consumer Relations
    1-888-519-7387
    [and NV website listed]

    I responded and thanked Kim for letting me know and promised to share this information with the sites I had consulted. Of course I had to register/join first since I had been a lurker prior to this posting (grin grin) so here I am. And Hannah, too …

    Purrs to all, and we hope this information is helpful …

  14. Debbie January 1, 2015 at 9:39 am #

    I’ve recently discovered Steve’s Real Food and found it to be very cost effective. However I’ve noticed a change in the litter box and now have some concern about the nutrition. All three of my kitties, a 13 year old male and two 1 1/2 year females, have been on a commercial raw diet following your top choices since the kitties weaned from formula. Any information or input would be appreciated.

  15. Zoey January 2, 2015 at 3:11 pm #

    Anyone try Wysong Epigen? Supposedly 95% meat from USA.

    • Leannan February 8, 2015 at 4:33 pm #

      I fed Wysong Epigen 90 and I also had my cat allergy tested “for” it, since I already knew he was NOT allergic to chicken. It passed the allergy test, in relationship to my cat. My thought is this, since Epigen 90 is expensive and a dry food, (even Dr. Wysong will tell you that dry food is less than optimal for cats, but he made Epigen, which is the best dry food line available, since people want to, and still will, feed dry) why not feed PRIMAL freeze-dried (REHYDRATED). Primal products, rehydrated are better than any canned cat food I’ve found.

  16. Shoua Vang January 4, 2015 at 3:52 pm #

    Has anyone heard or used JJ Fuds raw cat food? We just bought a 10 lb bag for $28 but haven’t had our kitty eat it yet. We originally wanted to keep feeding him Rad Cat (which he goes crazy for!) but it’s gotten pretty expensive. Let us know if there’s alternatives. We’re not looking for cat food that we have to supplement, only complete balanced ones.

  17. Jenny Bauman January 7, 2015 at 5:43 pm #

    You’ve got Stella & Chewy’s Freeze-Dried Raw on here, but what about their Frozen Raw? They’re the same flavors as the freeze-dried, and the identical ingredients. Is it safe to assume the Frozen Raw should be on this list too? Or is there some particular reason it’s not?

  18. Chris January 8, 2015 at 11:55 am #

    This article is SO helpful! Just wanted to say thanks for sorting through the mess of awful cat food products and putting this together. I just adopted a 10-month old kitty and he will reap the benefits of your research! I am grateful!

  19. Cat Allergy Shampoo January 15, 2015 at 11:28 am #

    I don’t suppose your cat is allergic to chicken or turkey, however he or she is perhaps allergic to alternative ingredients within the food. have you ever tried giving your cat raw food? lots of additives, salt, artificial vitamins, fruits and high starch vegetables cause issues in cats.

  20. Marie January 17, 2015 at 8:30 pm #

    I have rescued two kittens in October, when they were about five weeks old, and have recently taken on three females (sisters), whom I am fostering until I can find good homes for. I have tried Blue Buffalo, Wellness Core, canned and dry, Natures Balance, wet and dry and now I feed all five Natures Variety Instinct, LI. formula canned only. My cats all seem to like this food, my only concern is the Clay they add to their food. I switched from Wellness because of the Carrageenan, but have read that they clay can be quite toxic to cats. I am so confused and over whelmed. I see your recommendations on your blog are as follows:

    “It always helps to serve simple high-quality formulas like Feline Pride’s (raw) and Life’s Abundance Instinctive Choice (canned), Hound & Gatos, and Tiki Cat Koolina Luau canned and Puka Puka Luau”

    Tiki Cat and Hound & Gatos contain Taurine, which I thought was toxic. Would they still be considered a better option over wellness and blue because they contain Carrageenan? Also, do you still recommend Life’s Abundance? Any feed back would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you so much!

    Marie

    • Linda January 18, 2015 at 11:32 am #

      Marie, taurine is *essential* for cats – not toxic! Without it they get retinal damage and heart trouble. One issue with home cooked food for cats is that cooking destroys much of the taurine – that’s why it must be added to cooked cat food products.

      • Marie January 19, 2015 at 8:08 am #

        Thank you so much Linda. Maybe I’ll try Tiki Cat and/or Hound and Gatos. Or I might just go back to Wellness Core canned. I’m not sure if Natures Variety is what I should feed my kitties considering it has the montmorillonite clay. Any thoughts??

    • Kaye Beiswanger February 8, 2015 at 9:28 am #

      Taurine is a essential nutrient for cats. Taurine is necessary for normal function of the heart muscle cells. Taurine deficiency leads to weakening of the heart muscle, which in turn can lead to heart failure. Taurine deficiency can be fatal.

  21. Kaye. D. Beiswanger January 25, 2015 at 1:35 pm #

    This a great canned cat food and my cats love it – By Nature Rabbit Stew Wet Cat Food. It is grain free, no Carrageenan,and made in New Hampshire. The ingredients are sourced in the USA. By Nature is an affiliate company of the Blue Seal Foods Company. This company is mostly associated with the manufacture of horse feeds. This is because it was first opened as a horse feed manufacturer before expanding to manufacture foods for other animals. The company has been around since the late 1800’s so they have a long history. So far I have only found there products online.

    http://www.catfoodinsider.com/by-nature-rabbit-stew.html

    • mataba February 8, 2015 at 8:51 am #

      looked at by nature website and they do not have wet food for cats nor dogs; message says “coming soon”… and their contact address is in iowa??? and bottom of page tag says ” kent pet group”??? wondering what cat food insider is selling? also the formula ingredients include sodium selenite

      • Kaye Beiswanger February 8, 2015 at 9:22 am #

        I don’t know what is going on with their wet food products. They have new packaging. Maybe they are reformulating the wet food products.

        However, Blue Seal is a brand of the Kent Nutrition Group, Inc.

        The story of this family of companies had its beginning in 1927 when G. A. Kent started manufacturing cattle feed in a little mill in Indianola, Iowa. His first product was Kent Baby Beef, the first cattle feed composed entirely of high-quality protein with no filler material.

        http://kentww.com/history/

        http://blueseal.com/

        Sodium Selenite (selenium) is a trace mineral that is essential for many bodily processes and is needed for optimal health. It acts as an antioxidant, helping to protect against harmful free radicals.* People with gastrointestinal issues may experience decreased absorption of selenium, but supplementing with sodium selenite can help to fulfill their daily serving of selenium.

        http://www.twinlab.com/product/sodium-selenite

        • mataba February 8, 2015 at 9:44 am #

          thank you so much for your response about ‘by nature'; will keep looking into the ingredients…
          and thanks for info about sodium selenite… my concern stems from “truth about pet food” article you can find on http://truthaboutpetfood.com/is-selenium-toxicity-a-concern-for-our-pets/
          i paste part of article here–

          “Selenium is an essential (trace) mineral required in our pets diet. The most common form of delivering the required selenium in pet food is the supplement ingredient sodium selenite. Is sodium selenite safe for our pets? Further, is selenium toxicity sickening our pets?

          Mercola.com recently posted an article warning human consumers of the potential risks of some multi-vitamins that contain sodium selenite. The Mercola.com article states “both sodium selenite and sodium selenate are classified as “Highly Toxic”, based on oral administration trials using rabbits and rats.”

          “Studies have shown that:
          • Long-term exposure to selenium, sodium selenite, sodium selenate, or selenium dioxide may cause paleness, coated tongue, stomach disorders, nervousness, metallic taste and a garlic odor of the breath. Damage to the liver and spleen in animals has also been observed, according to The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
          • According to the 1986 edition of the Handbook of the Toxicology of Metals, daily intake of about one milligram of selenium as selenite can be toxic.
          • In one study, sodium selenite was found to induce substantial DNA damage in human fibroblasts.
          • More recent research also indicates that too much selenium may contribute to the onset of diabetes.”

          Ok…with pet food…

          The EPA (reminder: the EPA sets NOAEL – No Observed Adverse Effect Level – based on very detailed reviews of numerous studies) determined the highest allowable daily intake of selenium (for a 121 pound human, but based on animal studies) to be 0.853 milligrams per day. The American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has determined an adult maintenance dog food can have a maximum of 0.57 milligrams per day (based on recommended daily calorie intake, not body weight); AAFCO has no maximum level of selenium established for cat food within their pet food regulations. AAFCO has established a minimum requirement of selenium for both cat food and dog food at 0.03 milligram per day (again, based on recommended daily calorie intake).

          EPA – maximum 0.853 mg per day for a 121 pound human.
          AAFCO – maximum for dog food 0.57 mg per day – maximum for cat food none, based on recommended daily calorie intake.

          It needs to be emphasized that EPA recommendations for maximum intake of selenium are based on mg per kg of body weight (I converted kg of body weight to pounds above). AAFCO recommendations for maximum intake of selenium for dogs (no maximum for cats) based on calorie intake (oh, by the way – AAFCO still hasn’t decided on requiring calorie information on pet food labels yet).

          So, lets say a pet consumes the exact recommended calorie intake, a 30 pound dog would be consuming 0.57 mg of selenium (regardless of the type of selenium supplement) per day. According to EPA’s maximum a 30 pound dog should be consuming only 0.21 mg per day (regardless of calorie intake) to be within the No Adverse Effects level.

          EPA – (based on human maximum) 0.21 mg per day for a 30 pound dog.
          AAFCO – 0.57 maximum per day for all size dogs; no maximum established for cats.

          Setting the EPA/AAFCO maximum and/or lack of maximum levels aside for a moment, here is some more to think about regarding selenium…

          Some pet food manufacturers utilize ingredients that naturally provide the needed selenium such as organ meats, seafood, and plants. Some pet food manufacturers provide the needed selenium to a pet diet with the use of selenium yeast. (Selenium yeast can be a safer form of to deliver the required selenium to a pet diet; according to one study Sodium Selenite is “2.94 times more toxic than Selenium Yeast”. But, sadly, the FDA has not yet approved the use of selenium yeast for use in cat food – only dog food has FDA approval.) Most pet food manufacturers provided the needed selenium yeast to a pet diet by use of sodium selenite. And by the way, some of those same pet foods that add the potentially risky sodium selenite supplement also contain internal organs by use of by-product, by-product meals, and grains. By-product ingredients – by definition – include numerous internal organs — internal organs are one of the food sources of selenium. Grains as well can be a food source of selenium. So, not only are some foods adding a selenium supplement, some of these same foods contain a variety of ingredients rich in selenium content.

          As well, selenium content in various foods can vary greatly depending on the soil the food was grown in (grains, vegetables) and depending on the selenium content of the feed the livestock animal (cattle, poultry) was fed.

          A pet food manufacturer would actually need to test each and every ingredient (almost) of each and every batch of pet food for selenium content and then only add the remaining needed selenium supplement to the pet food in order to assure the pet is not consuming high levels of selenium. What is your guess as to how many pet food manufacturers do this? (Mine too!)”

          • Kaye Beiswanger February 9, 2015 at 2:33 pm #

            Wow, Mataba, thanks for all the information. It would be great if a person could just go buy food for our companions and not do any research. Have a great day!

      • Larry February 26, 2015 at 2:01 pm #

        Does anyone have any input on the New By Nature Cat Food?

        • mataba February 28, 2015 at 6:51 am #

          sorry for the long article from cornucopia institute that i paste below, but i think it is important to support this group… waiting for their 2015 update on carrageenan study…

          and to that point, ‘by nature’ official website still has ‘coming soon’ on the wet food icon; — the company has not answered my email about their food being sold elsewhere… i found their food on ‘chewy.com’ and the canned kitty food i checked lists carrageenan as 9th and 12th ingredient [except kitten chicken formula where carrageenan is 16th ingredient] — plus, the adult foods were all fish, so no way would i feed them to my kitties!

          just found “almo” wet cat food who do not have any additives at all in their food [claim that cats get all nutrition they need from meat, fish, etc…]; waiting for their reply to my query about source of their meat and where their processing facilities are… will not use exclusively, however, might be an occasional meal for variety…

          for health and time reasons, i am not able to make my own kitty food right now, but feel that may be only solution in the future… meanwhile, thinking of putting the shredded food into a blender for a more smooth/pate like consistency… going further into the ‘crazy’ zone — has anyone tried this?

          wishing you good luck with your search larry

          Cornucopia News
          Is Your Pet’s Food as Safe as You Think?

          December 9th, 2014
          5 Tips to Keeping Your Furry Friend Healthy and Well Fed

          By Linley Dixon, PhD

          In recent years, anecdotal reports by veterinarians
          suggest there has been a spike in serious
          intestinal maladies in pets. Americans spend
          about $22 billion on pet food each year.
          Source: DollarPhotoClub.com
          Pet food quality varies significantly and all too often includes dangerous chemical additives. In many cases consumers get what they pay for, but price doesn’t always indicate high quality. The good news is that discriminating shoppers will soon have a new tool helping them to weed through product labels and separate the good from the bad.

          The Cornucopia Institute has completed a thorough analysis of the pet food industry and will release a detailed report this winter.

          Our study reveals that many complete diet products significantly sway from the natural, wild diets of cats and dogs in terms of protein, fat and carbohydrate percentages. The majority of both dog and cat food product formulations contain too many grains and starches, including corn, wheat, rice, oats, peas, and potatoes. In addition, many products contain questionable and/or unnecessary ingredients.

          Meanwhile, among the most common causes of death for both cats and dogs are diseases affiliated with poor diet including obesity, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal diseases and cancer.

          Cornucopia’s report examines specific ingredients to avoid and includes a web-based buyer’s guide that will help consumers find high quality and safe pet foods. In the meantime, the following tips will help you get started finding the best food for your cats and dogs.

          1. Avoid carrageenan:

          You may be unknowingly harming your pets by feeding them wet food, even from the most expensive “premium” brands—despite extra care taken to find formulations high in animal-based proteins, low in fat and carbohydrates, and even USDA certified organic. Our research found that greater than 70% of canned pet foods contain carrageenan, a non-nutritive food stabilizer extracted from red seaweed. Peer-reviewed and published research indicates that carrageenan is known to cause intestinal inflammation with the potential to lead to cancer, even in small doses.

          Carrageenan is a non-nutritive thickener and emulsifier that can easily be replaced by safer alternatives in pet foods, including tomato paste, guar gum, potato starch, pea starch, tapioca, and garbanzo bean flour.

          New independent research (published in 2014) at the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center in Chicago, using both human and mouse epithelial cells, further demonstrates the mechanism by which inflammatory responses occur after carrageenan exposure using doses less than the anticipated average daily intake (50 mg/30 g mouse vs. 250 mg/60 kg person). This research demonstrates for the first time that carrageenan-induced inflammation occurs in both humans and mice, indicating that it is likely to cause a similar reaction in all mammals, including cats and dogs.

          Pets that eat primarily wet food with carrageenan will consume daily doses of carrageenan in amounts known to cause inflammation. In fact, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in cats is the most common cause of vomiting and diarrhea.

          Unfortunately, policy changes are often years behind the latest scientific research due to corporate lobbying and industry-funded studies that conflict with independent research.

          Some pet food brands are now advertising that they do not include carrageenan, such as Zignature dog food and Weruva cat food. Meanwhile, Hill’s Science Diet contains carrageenan, despite the label stating the brand is “veterinary recommended.”

          2. Buy organic (but without carrageenan):

          Many high-end “natural” pet foods contain carrageenan—and even Newman’s Own Organics wet cat food (which is not actually certified organic but, rather, “made with” organic ingredients) contains the ingredient. Organic foods should be a safe haven from chemical residues, antibiotics and questionable synthetic ingredients. Sadly, in this case, pet owners need to pay extra attention.

          There are two USDA Organic wet dog food brands that do not contain carrageenan: Organix and Cocolicious. However, there are no certified organic cat food brands that do not use carrageenan in at least one of their flavors. It is important to read each product label; Organix cat food shredded chicken flavors, for example, contain carrageenan although the majority of the brand’s flavors do not.

          3. Don’t fall for non-GMO claims (unless you see the USDA Organic label):

          Some pet food brands, such as Wellness, advertise that they are “made with naturally GMO-free ingredients.” This is likely an intentionally misleading claim. Without the USDA Organic label, you can assume that the feed given to the livestock used to produce these pet food products is almost certainly GMO.

          Wellness brand products do not display the USDA Organic seal. Over 90% of the soybean and corn currently produced in the U.S. is GMO. Though pet foods can test to be GMO-free, this does not mean that the meat animals were fed GMO-free feed throughout their life.

          The USDA Food Safety Inspection Service has only recently approved a non-GMO label for meat only if that producer can prove all the animal feed required to feed the number of animals owned is GMO-free. This label is currently missing from all pet food brands, despite non-GMO claims. Thus, only the presence of the USDA Organic label reliably ensures that meat animals were fed non-GMO grain.

          4. Avoid these ingredients, too:

          Pet food manufacturers don’t advertise the fact that pet food is composed primarily from food industry waste. Animal fat and animal meat and bone meal (MBM) are common pet food ingredients that are products of rendering (boiling waste products to sterilize them). Animal fat and MBM often come from a mix of different animal species, including expired grocery store meat, animals that died on the farm, and restaurant scraps, including used grease from deep-fat fryers.

          Animal fat and MBM are the ingredients in pet food most likely to correlate with the presence of sodium pentobarbital, the drug used by veterinarians and shelters for euthanasia. Needless to say, these are not ingredients you want your dog and cat to be eating.

          Corn gluten meal should also be avoided. It is used primarily as a cheap substitute for meat since cats and dogs are carnivorous and should have diets primarily based on meat.

          In addition, synthetic preservatives should be avoided, including BHA, BHT, and propyl gallate, since research has linked them to several health concerns, including cancer. Natural preservatives, such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C), tocopherols (vitamin E), and plant-based oils (such as rosemary oil), are better alternatives.

          5. Home-cook your pet’s food:

          One way to ensure a healthy diet for your companion animals is to cook for them yourself. Many chronic problems such as allergies, vomiting, diarrhea, and skin problems can be solved with homemade meals. Cornucopia’s report provides veterinarian-approved recipes and advice for cooking at home for both cats and dogs.

          In conclusion, the pet food industry is no different than leading marketers of human food when it comes to cheap substitutes and false health claims. Take matters into your own hands by reading labels and choosing high quality ingredients. Cornucopia’s soon-to-be-released report can help you.

          Moe in wicker basket

          Moe, the longtime feline companion of Codirector Mark Kastel.
          Sadly, just after Cornucopia completed its report on carrageenan in human food,
          Moe died in 2013 of intestinal cancer likely linked to carrageenan in his diet.

          Watch for the release of the Pet Food Guide this winter.

          See Cornucopia’s report Carrageenan: The “Natural” Additive that’s Making Us Sick, the Carrageenan Shopping Guide, and a questionnaire on the effects of eliminating carrageenan from the diet. Also sign the petition telling the FDA to remove carrageenan from our food supply.

          • Kaye Beiswanger February 28, 2015 at 9:45 am #

            If you make our own cat food you have to add the amino acid taurine. Taurine is destroyed in the cooking process. Taurine is a essential nutrient for cats. Taurine is necessary for normal function of the heart muscle cells. Taurine deficiency leads to weakening of the heart muscle, which in turn can lead to heart failure. Taurine deficiency can be fatal.

          • mataba February 28, 2015 at 10:28 am #

            thanks kaye, i know i will have to start search for best, safest, etc recipe soon… happy for the tip about taurine…

          • Larry March 2, 2015 at 9:24 am #

            I’m also searching for a good dry cat food to feed with canned & use for a snack. Any suggestions?

          • Larry March 2, 2015 at 9:34 am #

            mataba, the by nature canned food listed on chewy.com is their current food not the new food comming soon.

  22. Chloe January 29, 2015 at 12:56 pm #

    Hi Liz- I can’t help but feel totally inadequate (and poor :) ) while reading this list, but thank you so much for the information. Our family made the switch to totally grain free about 2 years ago when one had chronic diarrhea, and everyone has done great with it. it just makes so much more sense- cats aren’t frolicking around cornfields in the wild! I’m considering slowly transitioning my cat to a raw food diet thanks to your info.

    I ordered a variety of canned food from Only Natural Pet Store, and noticed that they sell their own brand of food, as well. I did order one of each flavor, as they were offered as a trial pack. Any thoughts on these? http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/Only-Natural-Pet-PowerPate-Canned-Cat-Food/999362.aspx

    they also sell their own brand of freeze dried raw food, but I’m not sure how it would stack up to the others listed by you. http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/Only-Natural-Pet-EasyRaw-Dehydrated-Cat-Food/999293.aspx

    Thanks so much!

    • mataba February 8, 2015 at 9:22 am #

      i have been looking at only natural pet ‘feline power pate’ too! my kitties miss a pate for for breakfast ever since i switched off wellness because of carageenan… for me, problematic ingredients in the ‘power pate’ formula are salmon [in the chicken and turkey — i keep my kids off fish], peas [not sure where i read they might be a problem], flaxseed [read liz’s article from 2011 on flaxseed and decided to avoid], new zealand green mussel and sea cucumber and kelp [potential contamination as with other seafood?], and sodium selenite…

      not sure if the problem ingredients are okay if given occasionally and not every day? i drive myself crazy with this, and kitties are worth it, so on we go! appreciate any feedback

  23. Monica February 19, 2015 at 9:05 am #

    Thank you for the list. I wish I had started making my own cat food or went raw way back but they are elderly now and don’t like change too much. They only like a pate’ now which I make soupy for them. Is there non-raw food on the list that you know to be a pate’? I had purchased a case of the Tiki Cat salmon to find it was strips of meat they just push aside.

    • mataba February 20, 2015 at 6:05 am #

      i too am searching for the ‘purrfect’ pate for my kitties… i ordered the samples from the honest kitchen, “grace”/dehydrated turkey, and “prowl”/dehydrated chicken…. they looked at me like i had lost my mind!!! have tweaked amount of water and thought i had a nice pate consistency, but kitties do not like… not even with their favorite bribe of fresh baked chicken bits…
      i am going to start ‘traditional’ transitioning by mixing some of the honest kitchen in with their dinner [right now, had to go back to wellness with the drat carageenan which i only give 3oz for dinner]…
      as a side note, they do like weruva peking ducken — not a pate, [it is shredded, but softer than tiki]; they accept for breakfast!
      i have lost track of how expensive this is, or isn’t… safe food that protects their health is definitely less costly than veterinarian bills and medications for sick kitties, i know that much!
      good luck to you and your blessed elder kitties — i wish someone would focus on additive-free nutrition for our beloveds who have reached the age where pate is so important!!!

  24. Ana March 9, 2015 at 9:14 pm #

    I’m going to feed my baby kitten Nature’s Logic canned food! It has much better ingredients that any foods listed above. What is your opinion? Thank you!

  25. Janine March 14, 2015 at 1:28 pm #

    Recent recall of Primal Turkey:

    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm438183.htm

  26. lb March 16, 2015 at 5:09 pm #

    I am looking for any addt’l info anyone has on Mauri canned or Wild Calling canned.

    • Bonnie March 16, 2015 at 6:37 pm #

      I have 5 cats. One of them will only eat Wild Calling and Avederm Chicken chunks. Wild Calling smells good in the can and Cabin Fever is her best choice of the flavors and has the most juice in the can.

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