Today’s best cat foods–reviews of canned and raw options

eating wet food 300x241 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options

SMALL UPDATE April 2014  (Blue Buffalo Bistro removed because discontinued. Blue Buffalo Wild Delights removed due to adding carrageenan. Also see July 2013 changes noted here)

This list is occasionally updated. You can help  keep it accurate and current by leaving info in the Comments. (To be notified of updates, get on the news list here.)

Scratching your head in the cat food aisle? I’ve been there.

In fact, I’ve become a bit obsessive about how to choose the best cat food. I hope the hours of research and time I put into it will help you–and your cat.

If you’re curious, I explain how I selected these cat foods here.

If your cat has special health issues, please be sure to consult with a good vet about their food. If your cat has an illness and weakened immunity, it’s probably a good idea to avoid raw meat as a precaution against bacteria.

To assure you these food reviews are unbiased, I never use an affiliate (referral) link for a cat food.

FIRST PLACE
CANNED OR RAW CAT FOODS

WHAT’S
TO LOVE

COST

SPECIAL
CONCERNS & TIPS

Nature’s Variety RAW
frozen

(except for Rabbit formula)
InstinctRaw 3lb orgchicken WEB 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Meats sourced from US and New Zealand (except rabbit)
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Raw is considered most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
GMO free
Owned by an independent pet food company (rather than large conglomerate). Manufactured in US at APHIS EU Certified plant.
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Rabbit meat is processed in China, so I’d avoid the rabbit recipes.
Uses water High Pressure Processing to kill bad bacteria while preserving the enzymes that make raw food nutrients so available.
Primal, RAW
frozen
primal raw 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Some ingredients are organic (not the meats though).
Small company focused solely on quality pet food.
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Raw is considered most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Very low starch, grain
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Tip: See their helpful food portion calculator provided online (it’s challenging to calculate amounts without it)
Uses water High Pressure Processing to kill bad bacteria while preserving the enzymes that make raw food nutrients so available.
Bravo Balance RAW frozen  Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Hormone-free, grass-fed red meats; no antibiotics

 

LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Only the BALANCE formulas are appropriate to serve to cats without adding appropriate supplements.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with kidney issues or constipation.
 
 
 
Tiki Cat Koolina Luau canned and  Puka Puka Luau (both chicken)
 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Very low starch, grain free
Manufactured in a human food factory
USDA certified chicken
Very simple ingredients– easy on digestion
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Made inThailand at a human food factory.  USDA certified chicken.
Feline’s Pride RAW Frozen felinespride 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Good variety of selections: Cornish hen, turkey, chicken, duck, and more
Simple recipe (best digestion)
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Recommended by Feline
Nutrition Education Society

and Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM is also a fan
Low starch, grain free
MED (when extra shipping costs are added) daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Order online at www.felinespride.com
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Darwins RAW frozen  Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
All meats are hormone-and antibiotic-free and free-range
Claim human-quality ingredients
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Simple recipe (best for digestion)
MED-LOW
Lab-tested to meet and exceed AAFCO guidelines
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation
 Pure Vita canned  PURE VITA1 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Grain free, low starch
Fairly simple ingredients
Manufactured at company-owned US plant
Fish meal is cetified ethoxyquin-free
No carrageenan

 

 

MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Good news: Though formula includes potato starch, the carb percentage remains very low (under 5%).
Good news: Controversial ingredient Menadione (synthetic K) was removed from product.
Hound & Gatos canned hound 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
No BPA in can lining
No carrageenan
Low starch, grain free
Claim human-quality
US food and factory
Very simple ingredients are ideal for sensitive digestion
LOW-MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Available at Pet Food Express
Best online price may be at PetFoodDirect.com
PAW NATURAW RAW frozen  Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Organic meats!
Low starch, grain free
Variety of formulas
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the AAFCO.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation
They also have a freeze-dried raw cat food that looks good.
Radcat RAW Frozen radcatraw 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
All batches tested independently for
total bacteria, Salmonella, and E. Coli
Omega 3s (fish oil)
Simple formula
Most ingredients are organic or pasture-raised.
Raw is considered most easily digested,
nutrient-available form of cat food.
Very low starch, grain free
VERY HIGH compared to others on this list.
HOWEVER, this is because the recommend serving size is larger than the serving size recommend for other raw products.
AND Rad Cat says some cats may not need as much as they recommend, depending on cat size and activity level.
Not quite as convenient to serve as other raw food because it’s
not pre-portioned
Good news for cats with constipation: Uses organic egg shell calcium instead of ground bones, so it may be more suitable for cats with constipation.

SECOND PLACE
CANNED OR RAW CAT FOODS

WHAT’S
TO LOVE

COST

WHY 2nd PLACE
& TIPS

Primal Freeze Dried RAW
 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Some ingredients are organic (not the meat)
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Add water  -  Cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t add water.
All raw dehydrated food are in 2nd place because they require water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Feline Natural Raw Freeze Dried by K9
 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Nice simple ingredients are easy on digestiom (if you add water as instructed -
cats accidentally overeat if you don’t)
Clean New Zealand sourced ingredients
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Stir in warm water (at about body temp); don’t have to wait to serve. Cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t add water.
All raw dehydrated are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
“Has been tested and exceeds the AAFCO minimum requirements” – including taurine. (Shane Bartlettf, K9 Natural Food)
Honest Kitchen GRACE DEHYDRATED
grace grain free cat food 4lb 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Only pet food legally allowed to call themselves “human grade” (they won a lawsuit). Company owned US plant is certified for organic and kosher products by the state of California.
Meat is steamed at low temperatures to kill pathogens while conserving nutrient quality, then dehydrated.
Grain free
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods. NOTE “Grace” is lower in carbs and simpler in ingredients than “Prowl”
You need to add water soak it for about 15-20 minutes before serving.
Introduce gradually. Texture is unique–some cats resist it. Ours like it better with ground turkey added.
Tip: Best deal I found on a trial
size
is at their online store.
Ziwipeak, Raw air-DEHYDRATED
ziwipeak 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Omega 3s (fish oil)
No hormones and antibiotics
8% more moisture than most dry foods–more if you add water.
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free; nice simple ingredients
LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT To support kidney and urinary wellness in healthy cats, I would not serve this without mixing in some water.
All raw dehydrated food are in 2nd place because they require water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Several experts say dry foods are too dehydrating for cats with kidney problems.
Stellas Freeze Dried RAW
STELLA CHEWY Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Nice simple ingredients are easy on digestion
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
All raw dehydrated are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
IMPORTANT: Add water; rehydrate for 1 minute.  Add water as instructed.
cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
LOTUS canned
lotus 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
No carrageenan
No ethoxyquin in fish
Very low starch, grain free
All ingredients sourced from US, Canada,
New Zealand
Made in small batches in US
Claim not to have BPA in lining
Medium daily feeding cost compared to
others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains large fish (4th ingredient), so should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
Taste of the WILD canned
tastewild 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
No BPA in cans
No carrageenan
No ethoxyquin in fish
Low starch, grain free
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains large fish, so should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
Also contains small amount of menadione sodium bisulfite (controversial form of vitamin K)
Nature’s Variety Instinct LID canned

LIDcat duck 5oz 0 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Meats sourced from US and New Zealand
(except rabbit)
No carrageenan
Very low starch, grain free
No BPA in 5.5oz and 3 oz cans
GMO free
Owned by an independent pet food company (rather than large conglomerate). Manufactured in US at APHIS EU Certified plant.
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because some consumers are concerned about the montmorillonite clay. Opinions about it are all over the map. Some consider it detoxifying, some say it could have contaminants. Here’s another company’s exploration of the topic.
Statement from Nature’s Variety: “Our vendor tests the Montmorillonite Clay used in our diets for toxins and it is guaranteed toxin-free.”
I prefer the LID formulas as they have more simple ingredients than other Nature’s Variety canned recipes.
ADDICTION Carrageenan-free formulas only: Duck, Venison, Buffalo, Rabbit, Turkey
ADDICTION 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Grain free
No carrageenan
Manufactured in company-owned New Zealand plant
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods.
Also because many formulas large fish, so those should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
Soulistic canned Carrageenan-free formulas only: Good Karma, Harvest Sunrise
 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Claims human-quality food sources and “free range” chicken
No GMOs
Grain free
No Carrageenan (Good Karma and Harvest Sunrise)
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods.
Other carrageenan-free formulas were removed from this list because they contain controversial ingredient Menadione (synthetic K)
Manufactured in Thaliand at USDA-approved human food facility
You’ll find it at PETCO
Stellas Freeze Dried Raw
STELLA CHEWY Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
More convenient than raw frozen food.
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
Nice simple ingredients are easy on digestion
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Add water; rehydrate for 1 minute.  Add water as instructed -
cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t.
All raw dehydrated are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with
kidney issues or constipation.
Great Life Essentials canned  greatLife 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Meats sourced from US
No carrageenan
Low starch, grain free
No GMOs

 

LOW daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because Great Life uses the Evanger’s plant  (US) for processing their own canned (not dry) formulas. In 2010 Evangers was found by the FDA to be using dishonest practices on their own formulas (since corrected). Therefore, some are uncomfortable with any foods processed at the Evangers factory.
SOJOS Freeze Dried Raw   Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Raw is considered the most easily digested, nutrient-available form of cat food.
Low starch, grain free
USDA meat
Variety of formulas to choose
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
IMPORTANT: Add water to ensure proper amounts of food and moisture; Cats can get dehydrated & accidentally overeat if you don’t add water.
All raw dehydrated foods are in 2nd place because they require added water to be healthy and many people may overlook this.
Includes ground bones—not recommended for cats with kidney issues or constipation
Meets (exceeds) minimum nutritional levels established by the AAFCO.com.
Tiki Cat Hanalei Luau Wild Salmon, canned
tikisalmon Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Sources through environmental fishing practices; seafood sustainability and food safety guidelines
Manufactured in a human food factory (quality is visible—looks and smells like human food)
Omega 3′s
No carrageenan
No BPA in cans
Low starch, grain free
MED daily feeding cost compared to others on this list
In 2nd place because contains large fish, so should not be fed exclusively due to concerns about accumulated ocean pollution toxins and/or extra iodine affecting thyroid health over time.
No longer contains menadione (controversial synthetic vitamin K).
Note: Avoid the TikiCat formulas that have carrageenan or grains in them. (This Wild Salmon one doesn’t have either.)
Life’s Abundance Instinctive Choice canned
Lifes Abundance Instinctive Choice Cat Food sm Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Simple ingredients, include organic chicken
Omega 3s (fish oil)
No carrageenan
Very low starch, grain free
No BPA in cans
US ingredients only
MED-HIGH daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because Instinctive Choice is manufactured in a Simmons Food facility – Simmons bought Menu Foods. (However, dreadful 2007 Menu Foods incidents/recall was related to foods with wheat gluten from China. This food does not contain wheat gluten or ingredients from China.)
Most cats love this food.
I can only find it online–by the case. I suggesting getting their trial size first.
You can save money & time with their auto-ship option.
 
Weruva Grain Free Pouches
 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
No carrageenan
Simple ingredients
Grain free
Responsive customer service
Certified GMO-free
HIGH daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
In 2nd place because contains starch, making carb count a bit higher than 1st place foods.
Beef is from Australia & New Zealand. Fish is from international waters, except for Tilapia, which is farmed in Thailand. Chicken is from Thaliand.
Manufactured in Thailand in human-food processing facility.
Wellness Healthy Indulgence pouches with GRAIN FREE labels only
wellness pouches 150x150 Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options
Grain free
High moisture
Less fuss than cans
No carrageenan
VERY HIGH daily feeding cost compared to others on this list.
Instructions say feed 2 pouches for every 5 lbs of cat, so an active 10 lb cat would need 4 pouches per day – that’s a lot.
In 2nd place because contains starchy ingredients, making carb count a bit higher than first place foods.
CAUTION: The pouches not labeled Grain Free contain oat fiber, which is gluten-free in this case, but may not be the most digestible substance for cats.

 

If your cat’s favorite natural cat food didn’t make the list…

Many cat foods almost made this list. There were so many foods, I had to be brutal in selecting.

See These natural cat foods didn’t make the “best” list: here’s why (includes the Runner Ups!).

Maybe I missed a food. Let me know if you have questions–I won’t always be able to answer every question personally, but I will add foods you ask about to my “To Be Researched” list.

I also started a list best dry cat foods here–with some health caveats.

Resources

Where to find these foods

  • Only Natural Pet Store (carries most of these foods – affiliate store chosen for their reasonable prices)
  • Amazon.com and Petfooddirect.com carry many of these foods.
  • Many brands are available online directly from the company that makes them
  • Your local pet food store (especially if holistic) may have some brands
  • Whole Foods carries Primal cat food

How to get your cat to eat new foods?

Resources for making cat food

Making your own raw cat food can cost even less than the packaged raw cat foods, and is one the healthiest things you can do for most cats.

However, it is absolutely essential that you do it right, and add proper nutrients—serious health problems could result if you don’t add the right nutrients.

Easiest way to get started making your own cat food with the right nutrients is to use a good supplement product like a Feline Instincts mix: You just order one of their mixes. Alnutrin is also a good supplement source for homemade cat food. If you’re in Canada or Europe TC Feline may be ideal for you. Others can get TC Feline in the US here. All these sources provide recipes and instructions so it’s not a mysterious process!

Some experts say you shouldn’t use store-bought meat (unless you cook it before adding supplements) because there are concerns about bacteria. Instead, they say you should grind your own or order from source that freezes immediately after cutting or grinding: Hare-Today carries many types of meats.

Tips: The No Bones About It or Alnturin with Calcium mixes are best for cats who have constipation issues. Feline Instincts and TC Feline also both have bone-free special mixes and recipes for cats with kidney problems.

Your experience? Let’s talk!

None of these foods are perfect, but they met my “best of” criteria. However, every cat has different needs, just like you and I do.

I welcome your experiences, opinions, and contributions in the comments below.

Join the natural cat tribe!
Join the hundreds of folks worldwide who receive exclusive updates, and get a FREE COPY of my eBook, 6 Natural Ways to Help Your Cat Live Longer! Just enter your name and email below:
catHappyYears transparentBG smallest Todays best cat foods  reviews of canned and raw options

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

1,041 Responses to “Today’s best cat foods–reviews of canned and raw options”

  1. charlotte March 2, 2014 at 9:17 am #

    Any thoughts on Feline’s Pride Raw Made Easy Mix? I’m looking to transition my cat to raw food and wanted to make my own. I see you listed a couple of other mixes, but not Feline’s Pride. Thanks!

  2. M March 2, 2014 at 10:07 am #

    What about Dave’s grain free canned cat food?

    • Jolie Cosette March 2, 2014 at 1:27 pm #

      I like Dave’s Turkey & Giblets–very low in carbs, a low-residue food. Unfortunately, it has carrageenan. Dave told me that he hopes to switch to a gum this year. My IBD cat does well on this food. I measure 200 grams of food with 200 grams of distilled water and Dave’s T & G consistently has a 6.3 pH. That makes me happy, relieved.

      As with many companies, the basic lines tend to be better than the organic or premium lines. Dave’s fancier stuff is chock full of carbs. Stick with his “old brown shoe” type of foods.

      I wrote a review for Chewy, saying what I liked about Turkey & Giblets. So did another woman, but it was clear she was talking about another variety because she mentioned all the vegetables. No, Turkey & Giblets has no vegetables.

      Dave also has a dry matter/ME/carb counter on his website, which I’ve transferred to my computer to fiddle with other products.

  3. Stephen March 2, 2014 at 12:26 pm #

    Hello,

    I found your website to be very helpful before making my decision. I have a few
    questions if that’s ok?

    Stephen

  4. Pat P. March 8, 2014 at 11:04 pm #

    Jolie,
    Thanks for your thinking of me with the introduction of new foods. As you indicated, I am not comfortable with a company that does not reply to an inquiry, as in the case of By Nature and now, with Wild Calling, and normally would write them off. I did find a can of Trot’n Tommy and Cabin Fever, which I hesitantly purchased for Teka, my anorexic girl, but haven’t tried them yet. I just have to try everything and don’t even bother to check websites for ingredients, since she has to eat, even if it’s not great food. I am still having continuous problems with both my CFR Troy boy, and of course Teka–all 24 hours of each day, not knowing when or if she will eat a food, despite the twice daily use of cyproheptadine.
    Sitting here, knowing I need more cat food, I don’t know what to purchase for either one of them. Finding a decent food low in phosphorus is almost impossible, and a good pate is not much better, esp. if it’s not eaten. I use some Radcat for my Troy even though it is too high in phosphorus and potassium. Teka, like most everything, won’t touch it. At present, the only food she will touch is FF Classic beef, which I don’t like for so many reasons. Since it is known to be very inconsistent (various reviews have supported this), she ignores it often. Besides my not liking the food nor just feeding the same food every day, I am afraid that one day she will decide she doesn’t want it any more. My vets are no help in food choices and don’t know why she doesn’t like most things. I am beginning to think that she knows that most pet foods are crap, and she can smell the diseased animals or junk ingredients. I frequently review both Tanya’s list of low phosphorus foods and Dr. Pierson’s nutritional list, but give up on them in frustration. I also keep looking for a good cat vet. The two that I have recently used are both dog vets and not very helpful, or worse, wrong.
    In any case, I will continue to check this site and hope that the situation will improve, and to quote Winston Churchill, “Never, never, never give up”, hopefully.
    As usual, I appreciate all comments from the fastidious and caring individuals here.

    • Cat Mother March 9, 2014 at 6:54 am #

      Wild Calling is very easy to reach and very cooperative. Phone number is 855.628.7387. Vice President is John and he formulated the products. He’s more than happy to talk to you. Hope that solves your problem. Sometimes emailing doesn’t work but phoning always gets some type of response in terms of getting someone on the line to answer your questions. Good product in terms of my research except for the fact that it has liver…it is the liver of the main protein used, except I’m told, in the rabbit formula. John was very forthcoming with lots of information.

      • leanansidhex March 9, 2014 at 4:57 pm #

        I was so excited when Wild Calling debuted, now it’s off MY list because it is canned by Evangers.

      • Jolie Cosette March 9, 2014 at 7:04 pm #

        I will continue calling Wild Calling until I get a response.

        It *appears* from Wild Calling’s website that the company has removed brewer’s yeast from three varieties–Inland Delight, Trot’n Tommy and a third one, the name of which I cannot recall. The guaranteed analysis adds up to 100%, so it’s easy to calculate protein/fat/carbs/crud. Best, the calorie count on the website matches MY calorie count–and the kcals are in the high 200s for a 5.5 oz. can. So far, so good.

        However, except for Trot’n Tommy, I cannot find these varieties anywhere. The Trot’n Tommy I’ve found, both on line and at my local pet food boutique, still has the old formula, which contains brewers yeast among the top five ingredients. Brewer’s yeast evokes an immediate inflammatory response in Jolie, confirmed by lab findings. This cat was born with FLUTD and IBD, which I spent over $80,000 at UC Davis in the late 90s to surgically repair, correct or minimize, so I cannot take any chances with yeast. I no longer have that kind of disposable income and Jolie no longer has any surgeries or anesthesias left in her, if that makes sense. Her last dental in November was literally her last dental. Jolie will be 19 on or about April 1.

        I’m not that concerned about Evanger’s. From what I’ve read, the company is still under strict FDA scrutiny for past misdeeds, so, ironically, I feel safer with Evanger’s as the manufacturer than the other canning facilities.

        I’m no longer adding liver to the cats’ raw, so a little bit of liver from a can doesn’t bother me. I’ve added D3–watch out for those gel caps; they contain soy and corn oils–and extra B vitamins. Both of my cats eat close to 1,000 kcals daily–unbelievable, I know, but you should see them fly from the catwalks to the cat trees to the catio/greenhouse, rarely touching the ground–so the calorie count in both their raw and canned is important to me.

        If and when I actually reach a human at Wild Calling, I will urge him to give Dr. Pierson the information she requests. Perhaps he doesn’t know how important that is to crazy cat ladies, of which I’m proud to be one.

    • lisa March 14, 2014 at 1:09 pm #

      One of the cat rescue groups I’m in contact with via Petco relies on one of the Soulistic formulas, I think chicken.
      The food filled the three of her needs (to feed many foster kitties): had to be low in phosphorus for CRF cats, carrageenan-free and all cats had to find it palatable. I don’t like when companies do not respond to customer inquiries either. I just dumped ZiwiPeak after feeding it for one year to my two cats. Although it contained carrageenan, I was impressed by its’ predominantly meat formulas. They appear to have pulled a fast one on customers, unfortunately, with new labels on e.g. their 6 oz venison cans. Older labels list carrageenan and new ones do not and yet the texture and same gelatinous substance is the same as the food with carrageenan. Carrageenan-free foods are generally soupier. The company stated last year they were going to remove the carrageenan and that they’d make a “big announcement” on their site and Facebook. This has not been the case and their website still shows the old labels while in some stores, the food with new labels is present. No longer does it list ingredients but rather “composition” and “additives”. No carrageenan or guar gum listed as previous labels so how do they explain that the consistency is exactly the same? Icontacted themm twice and they have not responded. So now someone who may be going through the aisles, reading labels of pet food will think the food is carrageenan-free and I doubt it is. I had not followed the carrageenan debate previously, however, now that I’ve been feeding my feline herpes kitty carrageenan-free food (Nature’s Variety), he’s actually doing much better – his in eyes in particular. Carrageenan, I found out, not only acts as an inflammatory in the gut, but an overall inflammatory in the body, this per Jean Hofve, DVM on littlebigcat.

      • Lisa March 14, 2014 at 1:18 pm #

        Sorry for all those typos folks, I’m not good at typing on a cell phone!!

      • Leanansidhex March 14, 2014 at 2:44 pm #

        Information about carrageenan can also be found at PUBMED.COM Carrageenan is used to induced stomach irritation in lab animals.
        Has your friend done a calorie count on [any] Soulistic formulas. If they are similar to Wervua (same manufacturer, they also make BFF) they may not be suitable for kittens, due to low calories per can.
        I believe Wervua states for adult maintenance [only] on it’s cans.

        • Lisa March 14, 2014 at 7:12 pm #

          Interesting, thank you – I will mention that to her. Thank you for the info and the link. I am amazed at well my cat is doing just after two weeks of removing the carrageenan, of course I can’t prove that but it’s the only thing different I’ve done with him.

    • Sandra Zaninovich April 19, 2014 at 9:39 am #

      Don’t know where you live, but my vet here in Los Angeles, Dr. Jeff Werber, is amazing. I’ve been going to him for more than 20 years and I think he’s brilliant and wonderful.

  5. Bert Picardi March 9, 2014 at 10:40 am #

    What is the latest on montmorillonite clay.? I notice it’s listed as a (possible) concern for Nature’s Variety canned food but not for NV’s frozen food, which also lists it.

  6. Pat P. March 9, 2014 at 1:47 pm #

    Since my cats will only eat pate, with the exception of Troy who will eat some raw Radcat, I once tried purchasing Tiki Kat, Puka Puka (a chicken one?) and pureed it, hoping for the best. Neither of them would touch it. They both used to really like my fried chicken, every part of it (before I became vegetarian). They decided that they didn’t want to have anything to do with it, after a while. So it probably isn’t worth pureeing other shredded brands. I tried boiling chicken, using baby foods, sprinkling stuff on top to encourage them, like tuna juice, Halo bits, bonita flakes, Fortiflora, catnip, Temptations-nothing worked.
    And, Jolie, neither one like the By Nature foods (organic or regular)–and I don’t either, since they didn’t reply to my email inquiry and refused to respond to Dr. Pierson’s request for her nutritional list.
    I’ll keep looking.

    • Jolie Cosette March 9, 2014 at 7:24 pm #

      Pat, I’m going to ask Dave’s what’s going on with his plans to remove carrageenan. Then I’m going to tell him how important it is to get in touch with Dr. Pierson. It doesn’t look like he has failed to respond, just that he hasn’t been asked. Several of his varieties are OK with me EXCEPT for the carrageenan. Still, it bothers me that he admits he has little control over the manufacturing process.

      Have you tried the fairly new Sheba pates? (I think you may have said earlier that you did; please forgive my lack of memory.) Nothing to write home about, similar to Fancy Feast, but if Teka eats the beef FF, she might eat the beef Sheba. I’ve found it at Walmart. Individual 3 oz. (2.8 oz?) cans for 50 cents; the variety pack of salmon, chicken and beef currently has a $1.00 coupon affixed. I’ll open a can of this if a container of raw isn’t completely defrosted–I won’t use the microwave–and I need to give the girls a snack but not something that will ruin their appetites.

    • logan March 10, 2014 at 10:18 am #

      Hi Pat. I have a few suggestions. I would first look into dr. jean’s website Littlebigcat.com. She has some information on there about a supplement called bio superfood with alot of case results from other cats with severe health issues. Just type in bio superfood in the search line and all of her blogs discussing this will come up . Also, are you familiar with Claude West the cat man? He has a cat with CRF and has alot of helpful information. His facebook page is tipsaboutcats.com I believe. Or you can just type in Claude West on Twitter. The website for BioSuperfood is OptimumChoices.com . If you want to ask them questions about the supplement, there is a live chat option on the website too. They were very helpful for me. I hope this information helps.

  7. Jolie Cosette March 9, 2014 at 7:50 pm #

    OT, but important: Do you know what’s in your tap water? Do you know its pH? This sounds like I’m part of the tinfoil hat crowd, and maybe I am when it comes to cats. But it makes no sense to me to worry about the food if we don’t worry about the water, too. It was easy for me to get this information from my water company because I live in a small area; I don’t know how easy it is if you live in Los Angeles or Chicago or New York.

    My water has a 7.8 pH and is full of magnesium and various calciums, observable microscopically. (Yes, I know most people don’t have high-powered microscopes.) I use distilled water for the cats, both in their fountains and in their food. 88 cents a gallon (Walmart generic). My cats swim a lot in the winter, so I rinse them with distilled water, too. Many sites recommend filtered water, but minerals have been added to filtered water, including sodium for taste. I’ll drink my tap water but I won’t let the cats drink it.

  8. Claire March 12, 2014 at 6:18 pm #

    Have you heard of or tried Murr (from Iceland). I got some pouches, and it appears to be organ meat from lamb, beef and pork. No grains, but there is potato starch. It comes in small tear-open bags (like Indian food in a pouch). The cats seem to love it. It says it’s organic.

  9. pru March 17, 2014 at 9:34 am #

    Thanks for your site; I’ve long wanted to find a list that’s regularly updated like this one.

    Wanted to mention a few things that I was thinking as I read your site…

    –While I agree pouches are more convenient sometimes than cans, they present other issues like potential health risks. Because the cat food is basically cooked in its container, if it’s a can with BPA, the BPA lining leaches into the food, right? Same deal with the pouches, except less is known about what and how much of the plasticizers are leaching during the cooking process. And same deal with the foil liner. Check out this link for an interesting discussion:
    http://pprc.org/index.php/2013/networking/p2-rapid/do-plastic-chemicals-leach-into-food-from-sous-vide-sv-cooking/

    –And then there’s this article below by Dr. Hofve, which I just came across… (Now I’m going fish-free again for my cats, which is going to make them SO SAD. But ugh. This article makes a lot of compelling points…)

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
    Why Fish is Dangerous for Cats
    November 18, 2010
    By Jean Hofve, DVM

    A lot of cats love fish, but it’s really not a good idea to feed it to your cat! Why not? Because it is simply no longer safe to feed to cats (and humans should be very careful about eating it themselves and feeding it to children!).

    * The fish used in canned pet foods usually includes bones, and is high in phosphorus and magnesium, which can be an issue in cats with a history of urinary tract disorders or kidney disease. In practice, I have seen quite many cats develop urinary tract infections and blockages if they eat much fish–even boneless fish like canned tuna.

    * Many cats are sensitive or even allergic to fish; it is one of the top 3 most common feline food allergens.

    * Fish-based foods contain high levels of histamine, a protein involved in allergic reactions.

    * While cats can synthesize their own Vitamin K from most food sources, fish-based foods may not support sufficient Vitamin K synthesis. Vitamin K is necessary for proper blood clotting. The most common synthetic Vitamin K supplement, menadione, has toxicity issues. We do not recommend feeding any cat food containing menadione.

    * There is a known link between the feeding of fish-based canned cat foods and the development of hyperthyroidism in older cats.

    * Predatory fish at the top of the food chain, such as tuna and salmon, may contain very elevated levels of heavy metals (including mercury) as well as PCBs, pesticides, and other toxins. Tilefish (listed on pet food labels as “ocean whitefish”) are among the worst contaminated, along with king mackerel, shark, and swordfish. These fish are so toxic that the FDA advises women of child-bearing age and children to avoid them entirely; and they recommend only 1 serving of albacore tuna per week due to its high mercury levels. If these fish are dangerous to children, cats are at even higher risk!

    * A substance called domoic acid, a very stable, heat resistant toxin produced by certain species of algae that are becoming more common in coastal regions due to climate change. Domoic acid particularly accumulates in mussels, clams, scallops, and fish. Because it is so dangerous, the FDA limits the amount of this neurotoxin in seafood. However, new research indicates that domoic acid causes damage to the kidneys at concentrations 100 times less than the amount that causes brain toxicity. This is especially concerning for cat guardians, because not only can the legal level of domoic acid in any seafood harm the kidneys, but fish that are condemned for human consumption due to excessive domoic acid may instead be processed into pet food. Could contaminated fish in cat food be a hidden factor in the high rate of chronic kidney disease in older cats, who may have been eating this toxin every day for years?

    * Fish and other seafood in the Pacific Ocean have been exposed to leaking radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power facility in Japan for nearly three years. While the authorities continue to assert that there is (so far) no danger from eating Pacific seafood, the plant is still releasing 300 tons of highly toxic radioactive water into the ocean every day, with no end in sight. The first part of the initial radioactive plume has already reached U.S. shores; and low levels of Fukushima-specific radioisotopes have been found in West Coast seafood. While the Pacific Ocean’s vastness can and does greatly dilute the radioactive materials, the continuing leakage–as well as Japan’s recently-revealed dishonesty about its estimates of the amount of radiation involved–is cause for some concern. Arecent meta-analysis found reported significant negative effects on the immune system, and well as increased mutations and disease occurrence even at extremely low levels.

    * Salmon is a popular cat food ingredient, but today nearly all of it comes from factory-farmed fish. These unfortunate animals are kept in overcrowded net pens– feedlots–in polluted coastal waters. They’re fed anti-fungals, antibiotics, and brightly-colored dyes to make their flesh “salmon colored”–it would otherwise be gray. Common water pollutants such as PCBs, pesticides, and other chemicals are present in farmed salmon at 10 times the amount found in wild fish. These contaminants will be present in any product made with farmed fish, including cat and dog food.

    * “Organic” salmon is also farm-raised, and does not have to comply with USDA organic standards. In fact, there is currently no regulatory agency in the United States that sets organic standards for fish. The contaminant level of organic farmed salmon may be just as high as that of conventional farmed salmon.

    * Even “wild-caught” Alaskan and Pacific salmon may have been born and raised in a hatchery.

    * Farmed salmon transmit diseases and parasites; those who escape their pens (and they do) outcompete and interbreed with wild salmon.

    * A 2006 study confirms that salmon farms are “massive breeding grounds” for sea lice. Under natural conditions, wild adult fish carrying these parasites are not in migration channels at the same time as the defenseless, inch-long baby salmon, so infestation of the young fish is not a problem. But today, in waters near fish farms (which tend to be located at the end of those same migration channels), up to 95% of baby salmon are fatally infested. It is feared that that farmed salmon from nearly 300 fish factories in North America may ultimately decimate the wild population in the Atlantic.

    * New research (Dec. 2013) from the University of California raises concerns that the plastics floating in our oceans are absorbing chemical pollutants from the water. Toxins can move up the food chain, starting when fish eat small, contaminated pieces of plastic. Those contaminants enter their tissues, and are transferred to those who eat the fish: including bigger fish (e.g., tuna, mackerel, and tilefish–the fish most commonly referred to as “ocean whitefish”), as well as people and pets.

    * Fish tends to be “addictive” to cats. They love it, and will often stage a “hunger strike” by refusing their regular food in favor of fish. Tuna or other fish should be reserved as a rare and special treat. Feed fish no more than once a week, and even then in very small amounts only.

    * The meat is unhealthy, and the fishing/aquaculture industry is environmentally destructive–need we say more?

    In general, the small amounts of “fish meal” included as a flavoring and/or source of omega-3 fatty acids in cat foods are not a problem, but fish should not be a mainstay of any cat’s diet. Fish should be limited to an occasional–and small–treat.
    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

    A few more thoughts…

    –Still freaked about the Bravo! and other raw food recalls from these last years. I don’t want to mess with salmonella etc. I only feed raw if I make it myself, which, honestly, is like hardly ever. Wish it could be more often, though. My cats do love cooked grain-free food, and it’s better than canned, so when I can make that happen I try to.

    –Blue Buffalo should be X’d off the list, in my opinion. Check out the long list of consumer complaints online at consumeraffairs.com. Yikes.

    –Lotus told me they use GMO ingredients, if that is a concern for anyone. Plus, there’s soy. Thyroid issues potentially?

    Gonna have to teach my cats to be Breatharians soon, it seems, until the air is too polluted for that too. ;>)

    Thanks again for your site; you’re doing a valuable thing for our 4-leggeds and we all send you kitty kisses for it (slow blinks your way)…

  10. Jo March 24, 2014 at 2:41 pm #

    Is anyone else having issues with certain brands of cat canned foods lately? I finally got 2 cases of Ziwipeak Lamb and it’s rock solid that a fork gets stuck. I know it has carageenan in it, but somethings needs to be compromised or else I won’t have anything to feed her. And then previous to that there were icky looking things in the Hound and Gatos Rabbit. I completely understand that not all batches of food will be the same, but there is lack of consistency, so to speak; it’s on and off. It’s very frustrating. I would change her food completely if she didn’t have megacolon, but she needs the consistency when it comes to her diet. Ah this is endless…

    • Jolie Cosette March 25, 2014 at 3:06 am #

      I bought Ziwipeak for the first time in February, thinking the carrageenan had been removed (nope). I bought the venison at my local pet boutique to mix in with some really fatty raw duck.

      You’re right–the fork stuck right in the can and kind of “boinged.” I thought that was the way it was meant to be. I scrambled it in a bowl with water and added it to the raw, because there was no way I could fold it in. I can’t describe its texture. Hard, almost dice-able.

      I truly don’t know why I don’t go 100% raw. Maybe I just don’t trust myself. But the less canned cat food I buy, the odder it appears to me.

  11. Jan March 25, 2014 at 1:28 pm #

    I just found 2 more canned foods without carrageenan – “Hill’s Ideal Balance Grain Free” and “Organix Grain Free”.

    • Jolie Cosette March 25, 2014 at 7:48 pm #

      Thanks, Jan. I was recommending Organix because it’s low in phosphorus and carbs. However, two of my cats (when I had four) threw up on it. One, Jolie, pretty much throws up everything, but not Zen. Then I found out it was made by Merrick. For some reason, my same two cats threw up when they ate Merrick.

      If your cats can eat Merrick, I’d recommend Organix.

      OT: Jolie will be 19 in one week!!! (Her sister, Zen, made it to 18-1/2). Considering that at least three vets strongly urged euthanasia before she was six months old, I think she’s doing pretty darn good, even if she is the snarkiest diva to walk this planet. Wet food matters!!

      • Jan April 1, 2014 at 5:13 pm #

        Thanks Julie for the info that Organix is made by Merrick, I’ve never been too crazy about Merrick as some people reported finding some weird things in their food including moldy canned food (according to the truth about pet food web site). It could just have been a canning problem for awhile but still, not good to hear.

        Congratulations on your Jolie turning 19! That’s wonderful!

        • Darren April 4, 2014 at 4:48 pm #

          The impressive thing about the moldy can issue was that they handled it, and did so fairly quickly. Not all companies would even bother to respond to an isolated incident like that until a recall was forced upon them. Whether or not it was even an issue with Organix is unknown. On the plus side, Organix uses organic ingredients from the USA and is manufactured in-house in the USA, not by a third party like Diamond or Menu/Simmons. Can’t say that about a lot of pet foods! On the down side, my cats don’t seem to like it as much as they used to like it, so I’ve stopped buying it recently. Granted, that is true of a lot of brands I had been feeding them. I’m trying a few cans of Weruva chicken again, as it has a much nicer smell and texture than most others, despite the reservations I have with Thailand production and ingredients, not to mention the relatively high cost and low calorie content.

      • Jan April 1, 2014 at 5:15 pm #

        Whoops, sorry I called you Julie, was thinking of someone when I typed that name.

  12. Matilda April 3, 2014 at 1:15 am #

    Hi Lisa, thanks for such a comprehensive list! My cats and I reside in Singapore, and I’m afraid that there’s just no cat food here that’s both carregeenan and gum (any kind of gum) free! I’d love to hear more from you about cat wet foods that don’t contain either of these additives :)

  13. Matilda April 3, 2014 at 1:19 am #

    Hi Lisa, thanks for such a comprehensive list! My cats and I reside in Singapore, and I’m afraid that there’s just no cat food here that’s both carregeenan and gum (any kind of gum) free! I’d love to hear more about cat wet foods that don’t contain either of these additives :) It’s really hard finding something authentic that doesn’t contain anything harmful!

  14. Betsy larey April 7, 2014 at 8:52 pm #

    I stopped buying taste of the wild for my dogs and cats because Diamond makes it. The dry cat food version is called roasted venison and salmon. The first ingredient is chicken and you have to go far down the list to find venison and salmon. That’s bait and switch advertising in my opinion

  15. naomi April 8, 2014 at 1:41 pm #

    Ingredient in Hound & Gatos Homestyle Chicken For Cats. (Canned)

    Cassia gum – A food additive made from the endosperm of Senna obtusifolia (also called Cassia obtusifolia or Cassia tora). It is a polysaccharide used as a thickener and gelling agent in pet food, and has E-number E499.

    Why – First, it’s a complex sugar which is not good for cats. Second, there have been biological studies done on Cassia gum effects on cats, dogs, and rats in 1980’s for FDA, where kittens that were administered high dose (2.5% of daily nutrition) and kittens that were administered moderate dose(0.75% of daily nutrition) of cassia gum per day all died after 2-3 weeks; Their mothers and fathers were given cassia gum before and throughout pregnancy period. There was also a decrease in appetite and changes in digestive processing due to the fact that cassia gum absorbs much of moisture inside the digestive tract. Another interesting thing is that in the group where higher dosage was administered there were a lot more still born births and neonatal deaths.

    • Liz-cat April 10, 2014 at 12:05 pm #

      Disclaimer regarding this comment: I have not seen a reliable source for that information about Cassia. If it is adequately confirmed I will be sure to make it an unacceptable ingredient, but the information on Cassia research that I found did not reflect the above assertions (as yet).

  16. Larry April 10, 2014 at 10:58 am #

    Can anyone recommend some good canned pate cat food?
    Thanks

  17. Bonnie Magallanes April 10, 2014 at 9:03 pm #

    The best pate canned cat food that I have found is “Wild Calling” and all my 5 cats love it. One of my cats had IBS and now it is all gone. The hard food I give them is Orijen.

  18. Naomi April 15, 2014 at 6:22 am #

    MY 18yr experience with my beloved rescued Maine Coon medium haired mix cat – Godiva.

    I’ve tried over 20 brands of HARD cat food and from 9-14yrs old I stayed with Wellness Indoor Health Chicken.
    I’ve tried over 18 brands of kitty litter and Feline Pine (green bag with cat face in jungle) is BY FAR THE BEST! No scent, barely tracks, natural, efficient absorption. They were the first ones to hit the market and now there are others trickling in but I’m still faithful to the “original” makers.

    At 15yrs young she’d only been to the vet 3x for basic shots required when she lived in a place she could go outside. Then she had her FIRST concern vet visit. Her hair was falling out…growing in dull and short…and she’d scratch profusely. Turns out she was allergic to the tick/flea medicine. (Dummy vet didn’t figure that out – I did.) Six months later her hair filled in a bit but never the same and the hair above her butt was always very shallow.

    This is also when I started her on CANNED food taking her off dry. About a year went by…I tried different non-toxic brands…most always had some type of “thing” in it but I struggled finding anything that was ABSOLUTE. It was a costly process but I always stayed true to “only food with wings” as I like to say. All was fine. Then I came across Weruva. Cats in the Kitchen Chicken Frick a Zee. As “absolute” as I could find back then and made in the 5.5oz cans vs the teeny ones I hate. Within two weeks her hair sprouted like a Chia Pet. Everyone noticed. “Oh my gosh, look at Godiva’s fur…she looks amazing.” Even the shallow area grew in beautifully. The only problem…she was not so keen on it. It’s bland. Taste it. I contacted them asking for advice since some of the other flavors had “toxic” stuff in them. Within 24hrs a main company head sent me a very personal and detailed email answering my questions. Wow! Impressive customer service! I fed her that brand/flavor up until 6months ago because I find cans a hassle, costly, and having to mix it with stuff to get her to love it…I was done. Time to try raw frozen with vitamins mixed in. It’s a much easier process I find and cheaper.

    She also loves to drink from the faucet which I think has a lot to do with her amazing healthy. Cats natural instinct is to drink flowing water = rivers. Plus, it’s cool. Who likes room temperature water?! I also REPLACE (not add to) her water bowl every morning/night with cool tap water…wash her food bowl with hot water and my hands after each feeding…wash her water bowl once a week. I see so many folks with disgusting pet dishes on the floor. I’ve put my hand inside the water bowls feeling a slime that gathers lining the bowl – for those who don’t wash the bowl…just keep adding water.

    Now we live in a place she can’t roam outside so I take her on a walk each morning and early evening on a leash where she’ll eat grass sometimes to get a hairball out…etc. In the wild they also eat grass for the moisture. I also keep a cat brush by the toilet. She knows she’ll get brushed if she sees me there. ;)) It really keeps their coat nice especially under her arm pits where knots can gather.

    So there is my experience in loving a very healthy young 18yr young cat. We had a chat and she’s agreed to beat the current world record of longest living cats. Haha.

    Keep in mind…your cat could be 24yrs young living off McDonalds Meow Mix or Whiskas. I’m just sharing my experience with my beloved Godiva.

  19. Sandra Zaninovich April 19, 2014 at 9:47 am #

    Tiki Tiki Cat has added some great-sounding new flavors lately, can you look into them and let us know? My eyesight is so bad I can’t even read the ingredients with my glasses :-(((.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Dry food - Page 2 - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums - May 8, 2012

    [...] [...]

  2. Carrageenan: should it be in your cat's food? | The Conscious Cat - June 7, 2012

    [...] Eastwood of Natural Cat Care Blog has several other canned foods on her list of recommended raw and canned foods. Her recommendations look good to me, but since I don’t have any personal experience with [...]

  3. Quora - July 3, 2012

    What are the healthiest wet and dry cat food brands?…

    Great advice re more natural food. Unfortunately here in Australia we only get very few natural/healthy cat foods, usually from the US/Canada. At one point Orijen cat food was being radiated!!!! with gamma rays for what reason I have no idea and it cau…

  4. The Primal Feline - how to feed a toothless carnivore? | Mark's Daily Apple Health and Fitness Forum page - December 18, 2012

    [...] the fridge dish to her food bowl. For additional cat food info, I highly recommend Liz's list of Best Cat Foods on the Natural Cat Care blog. She has a facebook group too where you can chat with very [...]

  5. Best Cats Videos — Cat Food – Wet - May 11, 2013

    [...] http://www.naturalcatcareblog.com/2010/12/the-7-best-natural-commercial-cat-foods-so-far/ [...]

  6. I have found some great tips and Articles this week I have been emailed to share with you by our dear Feline friend LizCat. The first article is “What To Feed Cats With Feline IBS, Diarrhea, or Frequent Hairballs”… | CHRONICLES OF PRINCE - May 24, 2013

    [...] first choice of natural cat foods from my “Best” list with the most simple, digestive-friendly formulas [...]

  7. What is the best cat food for kitty? -   - Page 3 - City-Data Forum - May 26, 2013

    [...] Here's a good list to start with. We feed our cats Wellness grain-free kibble, and Blue Wilderness wet food. One of our cats was addicted to Fancy Feast and wouldn't eat anything else for a long time. We finally weaned her off it by discretely mixing the wet foods until finally she was eating 100% Blue food. We've tried to get the cats to eat Werwuva since that is universally recommended by many holistic cat owners but our cats won't touch the stuff. I'm afraid to try raw food or they'll turn their noses up at that as well. Newman's Own canned is good too but it's pate is very 'gummy' so I recommend mixing it with some water before serving it. [...]

  8. blue buffalo? royal canin? - Page 2 - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums - June 23, 2013

    [...] is a site I found with a much better list of good foods to feed your cat. Today’s best cat foods–reviews of canned and raw options | Natural Cat Care Blog __________________ RIP Ziggy [...]

  9. Cat Food – Wet Or Dry, Which Type is Best For Kitty and You? | Splash Barbados.Com - July 10, 2013

    [...] N ews About Wet Cat Food: The Wet Cat Food Versus Dry Canned Cat Food PetSmartb Today’s best cat foods–review [...]

  10. Natures Variety Instinct and Avo Derm - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums - August 4, 2013

    […] canned is a great food. I'd be wary of the rabbit though since the meat is processed in China. Today’s best cat foods–reviews of canned and raw options | Natural Cat Care Blog __________________ RIP Ziggy […]

  11. Mustelamania » Canned Foods - August 20, 2013

    […] If you want some suggestions on canned foods to try, let me know! Or, head over to CatInfo.org’s comprehensive food chart for a very exhaustive nutrition value chart, which starts off with canned foods and ends with some commercial raw brands. Another nice, comprehensive list can be found at the Natural Cat Care Blog. […]

  12. Nature's Logic Canned Cat Food Duck & Salmon Product Review - October 27, 2013

    […] When I asked Liz Eastwood of the Natural Cat Care blog about Nature’s Logic, she said that she’ll be adding it to her best canned cat foods list. […]

  13. Update on Larz & Bisquie’s Diet Plan | Nette's Minty Kitchen - December 8, 2013

    […] foods, and I began acclimating the guys to this. To my surprise, they loved it! Tiki Cat is a very high quality canned brand that is highly rated, made with human grade ingredients and uses USDA certified Chicken for the type I feed them (Puka […]

I love to hear your thoughts! Leave a comment here:

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe the comments without commenting.